Remember: Stuff CAN Get Real Out There….

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Old Timey Scouting

This a bit vintage even for me, but this is pretty much where I started, too. Army surplus two-piece canvas tents with no floor [and no blue plastic tarps to put down under you], hemp and sisal rope, wooden pegs, jerry cans, neckerchiefs with hand-carved slides, wool, and whatever shoes you owned.

We.Had.A.Ball!

Putting a Fine Edge on Things…

When I was at the Great Pumpkin hammock hang last month, my friend R3l@X gave me a knife sharpening mini-seminar. I am fairly proficient, and have a variety of stones that have accumulated over the years, but I wanted to see if I could up my game. His system is based on the Lansky System of graduated hone stones and various polishing compounds on leather strops. I was way beyond impressed with the results, and ordered my own set when I got home.

From the Lansky site:

“The Lansky Deluxe Controlled-Angle Sharpening System [5 Stone] features:

  • Extra Coarse Black Hone: (70 grit) for re-profiling the bevel grind
  • Coarse Red Hone:  (120 grit) for edge reconditioning
  • Medium Green Hone:  (280 grit) for sharpening and less frequent touch-ups
  • Fine Blue Hone:  (600 grit) for most frequent touch-ups to keep your blade paper-slicing sharp
  • Ultra-Fine Ceramic Yellow Hone:  (1000 grit) for polishing the edge for a razor sharp edge
  • Honing Oil:  Specially Formulated for sharpening
  • Easy to use, multi-angle clamp:  to hold the blade securely
  • Guide Rods:  One for every hone
  • Extra long knife clamp screws for thicker blades
  • Storage/carrying case to hold all system components
  • Complete easy-to-follow multi-lingual instructions”

I ordered two additional diamond hones in Coarse (120) and Medium (280) grits because I knew that I had some, old, worthwhile blades that would require aggressive reshaping.

As you can see in the product materials, you clamp the blade in the jaws of the clamp, select an angle [17°/20°/25°/30°] that closely matches the existing edge, and using the rod mounted on the hone stone to maintain that angle with the slots, you gently slide the hone upward against and into the blade while sliding it sideways as well. The technique takes only a couple of passes to master, and yields superb results.

One of R3l@x’s tricks is to blacken the cutting edge of the blade with a “Sharpie” marker. Then you make 1 or 2 passes with the ultra fine, 1000 grit hone. That stone is so fine that it only polishes off the marker, and reveals how much the blade needs actual “grinding” down with the more aggressive stones to place/extend that polish right to the cutting edge. Any black between the polished of area and the cutting edge needs to be worked down. There are some other tricks and techniques that make using the Lansky System easier and more efficient… I will go into those when I do a planned tutorial on Basic Knife Sharpening sometime soon.

You just move up through the gradations of grit, moving from actually changing or improving the edge profile, thru simply refining out the grind marks, and on until you are merely polishing the final, “hair popping”, razor-sharp edge.

The results are astounding! I took the sad little neck knives that I bought for next to nothing out of Sham Shui Po, last seen in the post “You Get What You Pay For…”,  and achieved an unimagined sharpness that upgraded them from classic POSes, to really “OK”. I had them relegated them to survival kits just for batoning fire stock. Now they can shave tinder as well. They were the proof for the Lansky System in general, and the two diamond add-ons as well.

 

Using the Lansky is simple and effective. Combined with further finish honing on stropping compound sticks, you can easily get great results. The action is one that you can do semi-mindlessly while you listen to music or chat around a campfire. At an Amazon price of only $40 , and given the life it can quickly bring back to nearly any knife, in nearly ANY condition, that needs sharpening, it is close to a no-brainer to pick up.

Later, as needed, you can add the diamond stones, arkansas stone hones, a 2000 grit Super Sapphire Polishing Stone, as well as shaped stones that let you work on serrated and curved blades like “karambits”. They also offer two stands and a C-clamp to support the blade clamp.

Look for my upcoming [check the sidebar] Sharpening Tutorial to see some results.

 

Buying a Hammock

You want to try out hammocking, but don’t know where to start? There are a lot of “convenient” solutions out here… you can get one at Wally’s or on the net ASAP!

This post is gonna tell you that not all of them are gonna make you happy with the expense and the experience…. So>>

 

Thanks to Bill Puckett over on FB for starting a thread that was badly needed:

“I see a somewhat regular requests by new members along the lines of ” I don’t want to spend much money to try this hammock thing so what should I buy that’s cheap?”. Here is my 2 cents worth of wisdom. If you buy the better products and find that you don’t like hanging for some reason, you can ALWAYS sell your gently used gear for a slight discount to the original price. The good stuff when new rarely goes on sale so a bargain for nearly new gear with good reputation is almost always a workable proposition. The net cost (eyeball estimate) of a round trip (buy, try, sell) is probably less than the cost of cheap/poorly made/poorly designed that you buy then trash.

My advice? Buy the good stuff and learn to use it well. Do your homework before buying (watch Shug’s videos on YouTube and read “The Ultimate Hang”). I think you’ll have better outcomes and will ultimately save yourself both hassle and money.”

The second piece from the same thread is from Devon T. Cloud:

“I think a lot f you are missing the point of Bill’s post. Yes, you’re going to spend a lot of money on your UQ, TP, and accessories regardless. You are however still going to buy that stuff if you are REALLY going to give hammock camping a try. If you don’t purchase that stuff (or at least borrow it from a friend to actually try it) you are not really trying hammock camping. Using a pad and a sleeping bag renders hammock camping on par with tent camping and if you don’t purchase gear that holds your pad in place, maybe even less comfortable.

What Bill is more saying is don’t buy that Ebay or amazon special or other short, cheap hammock – purchase from a reputable brand. Yes you can spend 300 bucks if you want (I did and it was worth every penny), but you don’t have to. Dream Hammock makes a cheap hammock that has an integrated big net for around $125.00. Netless version is around 50 bucks. I believe Dutch has similar options at similar prices, and these are hammocks made out of the correct material instead of that stretchy parachute material that you will most likely never get a flat lay out of. 

In other words, if you are going to try hammock camping, commit to it enough to actually give it a chance instead of shooting your experience in the foot by purchasing an inferior product to save 40 bucks. That extra 40 bucks will make a difference in comfort that is so great it could be the difference between becoming a hammock camper and not becoming one. The extra 40 bucks is well spent one way or the other… after spending it you will truly know whether hammock camping is really for you or not.”

In response to Devon’s words, Thomas Ressler added:

“Very well put. Buy your second hammock first and if you don’t like it, it is easy to sell. Also many cottage vendors will give you a free look at it and you can return it for a full refund. That is our policy at Dutchware. Lastly not only is the value of our cottage vendors there but we have experience and aren’t a hammock made by someone who doesn’t eat work and sleep in a hammock.”

Mr. Ressler is also known to the community as “Dutch”…  suffice it to say he is one of the “gurus” of modern hammocking. His suggestion that you “Buy your second hammock first” is the single best expression of the whole thread.

 

I know that hammocking is gaining in popularity almost daily. I understand that the kids just call it “ENOing” after the ubiquitous Eagles Nest Outfitters hammocks that are out there everywhere from Amazon to REI. ENO clones are all over the net at prices going up from $15… the problems with these are that they are not going to give you that great experience you are hoping for. Some are as little as 8′ long. Most have mighty thin fabric. Most have really clumsy suspensions that are a PITA to get up safely… and ate heavy as well. Yes, many are offered as “double hammocks”. Friends… NEITHER OF YOU CAN GET A GOOD NIGHT SLEEP IN A DOUBLE HAMMOCK [and I don’t even want to get into the horizontal-bop-in-a-hammock thing here… you can try it, betting you won’t like it.] Plus, you won’t believe how much all that “double” fabric droops and flaps in yer face!

Best advice beyond that of the Dutchman, is get yourself over to the HammockForums.net site, go to the forums, read a whole lot of the posts there asking for advice and then scroll down to the vendor links and take a look at the choices. Or find the section on group hangs around the country and go to one… people will usually be glad to explain their choices and let you try out their gear.

Your money will be much better spent, and, most importantly, your experience will be exponentially better, too!