Here Comes The DynaFly

Just found this on the forums today. I chatted with Josh, the developer, for while this evening, and wanted to pass on his new video for you folks to see.

The DynaFly is still in development, and is not commercially available yet, but let’s keep our fingers crossed that it will find its wings. As the video shows, there are a lot of great things going on with this aerodynamic take on a hammock tarp that address issues like headroom, stability, storm resistance, ease-of-access and useability. Plus, it looks darn nice flying!  It is easy to understand why Josh has been refining his designs for five years.

Look for more on this down the road…

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Ah…. wow… er… ah…

I came upon this over on one of the blogs I follow on the Tumblr. Bushcrafters gone wild!

It pretty much epitomizes everything I’m not likely to do when I go out camping.

Talk about “Leave No Trace”~~ Two dozen+ live trees cut for unnecessary [and U.G.L.Y., and disfunctional, and inefficient] shelter, and a hacked up stump. I just hope this was their own property. If it was public use land, or a state park, I’d be pretty upset finding this on my trip down the trail. However, from the amount of gear, I’m guessing they didn’t walk in very far.

Drip-breaks for Hammocks

Sometimes when it rains, it pours. We have all been out in our hammocks when the rain’s come down right wickud. When it rains that hard, it’s very easy for the water to migrate down your hammock suspension and eventually start soaking the ends of your rig.

Our man Shug, Master of mirth and merriment, juggler extraordinaire, and the go-to-guy for tips and videos on everything regarding hammocking, just suggests tying an old sock around your suspension. That works… not very elegant, and your socks stay wet, but it works.

I wanted something a little bit better, and something that would remain on my suspension full-time. I have been reasonably satisfied with a simple loop of mason’s twine dangling down from my continuous loops. So I took off from there.

I had some old water skiing and tubing towline. I gutted out two, 8″ sections of some half-inch line, singed the ends on the gas burner, stuck a chopstick through one end to make a hole, and pushed my continuous loop right through.

        

You can see the partz-is-partz on the right…

What I really like about this solution is that the drip line is back under the end of my tarp, beyond the rain. Now, I haven’t tested these out and in a real toad floater yet… I just put them on this morning. But my other solutions where I’ve had my drip lines actually on the continuous loops have always served me in good stead. I’m not sure I see the point in having drip lines attached any where further out on the suspension. The edge of my tarp is where the rain is going to stop landing.

 

BONUS: Hint #2~~ The yellow stuff is a slightly larger diameter ski rope that I also gutted. The two yellow sections on the left of the photo have a section of the green line inserted inside end to end. All four segments are also flame sealed at the ends. This allows me to pass some thin Dyneema/ Zing-it type line through the entire length of the doubled sections.

Why? For the same reason we all use tree straps… To Be Responsible. If I am hanging off of trees with a thin bark like Birch or Beech, These cuffs give added protection from harm by the extremely thin line that might otherwise damage the cambium layer of the bark. If too many people use the same two trees and are careless about the way they hang, the trees can suffer.

 

Tarps, Guylines, Bling… THE Link

It scrolls down a good ways…. Best compendium of “instructables” I’ve found so far.

>the picture is the link<<

All of these images are of stuff available elsewhere on the web, like Derek’s book and page. Link is just a Google Image search. All links/images are credited on the Google page.
I just thought it was a handy reference…

The NEW Dutchware “Chameleon” Hammock

I would be less than a friend if I didn’t give my buddy Dutch a pump up on his new hammock. Originally asking for only $22,000, this Kickstarter portion of the project has now concluded with something over $200,000 in sales. All of those hammocks are currently being shipped out, and Dutch hopes to have the retail Chameleons available for order by sometime in mid June.

I had a chance to see one of the early-bird KS versions last weekend at the group hang down in Massachusetts. I was tremendously impressed. Quality construction, flexibility of use, a really nice new suspension system…. Dutchware has really nailed it on this one. They did a great job on both the hammock as well as on the on the video below. You should get a fairly good idea of exactly what’s on offer.

You will still need both a tarp and an under quilt to complete your set up, [and of course a top quilt or sleeping bag]. However, with a Chameleon as your base, you should be able to bring your entire sleeping system in at somewhere right around 4-5 pounds for three-season use.

 

[I received no consideration for this post. I simply want to recognize what I believe to be an astoundingly good product.]

 

 

A Good Question

I like my home being well-hidden
A dwelling place cut off
From the world’s noise and dust
Trampling the grass has made three paths
Looking up at the clouds
Makes neighbor in the four directions
There are birds to help with
The sound of singing
But there isn’t anyone to ask about
The words of the Dharma today
Among these withered trees
How many years make one spring?

– Han-shan