Kindle VOYAGE e-Reader Review

I am an unapologetic Apple fanboy. However, I am not a fan of either Apple’s own iBooksReader nor the Kindle application for phones and tablets. Thus I am also a Kindle e-reader fanboy.

I started off with one of the non-backlit, keyboard models…something like the Kindle 2, I believe. I had to buy a little clip on light in order to read in bed in the evening, or out in my hammock in the woods, but I loved the “electronic ink” reading experience. As long as you were reading outdoors or with a decent light over your shoulder, it was phenomenally better than the overly bright and glaring tablet and phone readers available.

When the Kindle Paperwhite was made available several years later, I upgraded to that and was even more satisfied. It’s not only had a brighter and clearer screen with a higher pixel count, But it introduced a”backlight”… Actually a row four light sources across the bottom edge of the screen that projected up evenly and could be adjusted from barely there to very bright.

Somewhere around 18 months ago, Amazon introduced the Kindle Voyage to their lineup, but it was awfully pricey, coming in at around $200 as opposed to a Paperwhite price of just over $100.

There was actually nothing wrong with the Kindle that I’m currently using, but there IS always that nagging “newtoyaphilia” that all technophiles suffer from. A week ago, Amazon put put them on sale for a slightly reduced price and I was very tempted. However, I thought to check eBay listings and I found one in “like-new” condition going for right around $100. It had the added advantage of being unit that did not come with “Special Offers”… ads by any other name, and another $20 charge to turn off. Anyway, I lurked, I sniped at the last second and I got it.

 

The seller shipped it that same afternoon and I had it two days later. Thankfully since it was used, it was just as represented. I couldn’t find a single thing wrong with it… Not even a scratch or an uncleaned fingerprint.

So, why would I [or you] want upgrade to something [originally] costing nearly twice as much?  Well, to quote directly from the Amazon site:

  1. PagePress sensors with haptics~ PagePress is a custom-designed force sensor made of carbon and silver, which reacts to a subtle increase of pressure, triggers a page-turn, and provides a haptic response only your thumb can perceive. Because PagePress has no moving parts, the haptics provide you with the most minimal indication that you have pressed the button, to reduce distraction from reading.
  2. Sleek yet durable designs~ Kindle Voyage was designed to come one step closer to a sheet of paper, with a flush-front bezel for a clean, streamlined design. With a magnesium back and a specially-reinforced glass front, Kindle Voyage is both durable and sleek.
  3. An unsurpassed 300 ppi display~ Kindle Voyage features a bright, high resolution and high contrast display. The micro-etched glass display diffuses light to eliminate glare and matches the feel of paper.
  4. Adaptive front light~ In order to more closely resemble reading on real paper, we researched and hand-tuned the optimal brightness setting for every lighting condition. The adaptive front light automatically adjusts the brightness of the display based on your environment, and can even be fine-tuned further to your personal preferences. When reading in the dark, the adaptive front light slowly lowers the display’s brightness over time to match the way the eye responds to darkness.

VS the Paperwhite:

  1. Touchscreen where you “swipe” to turn pages, and touch to “click” features
  2. The screen is inset, and is of some type of poly material with a slight texture
  3. The actual ppi is the same at 300
  4. Only four light sources vs the Voyage’s six.
  5. They both share a feature where they can power-up and resume where you left off reading by opening a magnetic case if you choose to add one.

The Voyage is also a little smaller in all dimensions, and the difference in weight is actually noticeable when you hold it for awhile.

I read a great deal, preferring it to television, so these small changes in the Voyage’s construction and details are noticeable to me, but might not be to everyone. In fact, most reviews that I read when it first came out suggested that unless you break your old e-reader, there was really no reason to upgrade to the Voyage. I would agree with that conclusion overall, but because I spend as much time reading as the average American does in front of the tube, it seemed that the upgrade might be worthwhile on my part.

I really like the difference in ergonomics that are the result of the magnesium case and the flush glass screen. The Voyage simply has a better feeling in my hand. I like the idea that I can use either the new haptic press OR the old faithful swipe to turn the pages. And I especially like the changes in the back light. This was where I had always had my most difficulty with all of the models I’ve had in the Kindle line.

 

The early units did not have built-in lighting at all, so, it was wonderful to get the real lighting feature in the new Paperwhite when it came out. However, that backlight always had a problem of turning itself off all on its own. I would pick up my unit, open the case, and the magnet activated screen would power up right where I had left off reading… but about 50% of the time that was without any backlight. I even went so far as to have my original Paperwhite exchanged for a new unit in the hopes that the backlight problem would go away… no such luck.

The Voyage initially auto-set the brightness to the same 14-15 range that I had been self-selecting on my own in my standard reading environment. After several days reading I have not had the light drop out even a single time.

As far as screen resolution goes, on the the Kindles, no matter what version, my go-to typeface has been Bookerley set at 5 on the slider… this is comparable to most library books in size. On the new Voyage the factory reset default was only to 4, and I was able to read at that [more like a paperback] resolution with very little extra effort.

 

This does allow for more screen real estate and less page fiddling. Somehow, the combination of the new glass screen, the better backlighting, and the existing 300ppi resolution, have created a more readable screen.

One feature on the Voyage that I cannot make any confident comment on yet is the battery life. You’ll notice in the second photo above that the battery has already dropped by perhaps 30 to 40%. I think this is because I had only remembered to toggle the “Airplane Mode” just before the photo was taken. Amazon, of course, leaves it turned on at a factory reset… They want you to spend as much time connected and deep in their universe as they possibly can. I am sure that the constant searching for a Wi-Fi signal causes the battery to drop more than it might under just a reading condition.

The conclusion is that I am quite happy with this “upgrade on a whim”. Plus, my newtoyaphilia is damped down temporarily… always a good thing.  Speaking for me personally, somehow the various small changes Amazon has made between the Kindle Paperwhite and the Kindle Voyage makes my reading experience better overall. The eBAY price and the condition of the unit that I received means that it comes in reasonably well on the 90%/50% scale as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Four-sided Gordon Diamond Hone Block Review

I ended up with an unwanted credit at the Harbor Freight store the other day… unwanted because they couldn’t/ wouldn’t give me back cash for a return where I had already paid off the credit card charge. Anyway I now had $50 on a card that I was planning on cancelling, so….

I picked up a 4-sided Gordon Diamond Hone Block for $12 of the credit. I figured I could toss this puppy into the knife drawer in the kitchen and reclaim my nicer DMT and Eze-Lap diamonds for my good knives.

The block’s four bonded diamond surfaces are claimed to be 200/300/400 & 600 grit. Since there is no real standard for “grit” claims, and it’s “600 Fine” does seem much rougher than my DMT “medium”… who knows. Any diamond grit surface will wear down with any use at all as the less well “bonded” stuff scrapes off leaving the rest. I’ll find out more as time and usage break it in. Who cares?…. it does what it says, and it is what it is… it’ll be fine for my not so expensive kitchen blades.

[BTW: this “wear in” does not mean that the diamond surface itself is becoming worn out. It only means that the material that stuck up higher and was less well “bonded” into the steel abrades off first leaving the the remaining surface fully usable at the grit grade indicated. I have that info direct from my contact at Eze-Lap… I have no real concern that these steel/diamond bondings will wear down any faster than the more expensive ones]

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can certainly see the difference between the 200 and the 600, as well as that the eyelets that catch the honed off debris are quite adequate. They are actually deeper than on a DMT block. The manufacturer seems to have left just enough space beneath to let the crud wash right out under running water for cleanup. Being a diamond hone, it of course just uses water for lubrication. Both factors make for quick and easy use in a kitchen situation.

To try it out, I gave two carbon steel Old Hickory steak knives a quick tune up on the two higher grit sides… they really didn’t need anything more intensive than that.  Added in a couple of stropping passes on my commercial, restaurant supply house chef’s steel, and I’m perfectly happy with the results. I don’t need to shave with them, just to cut a nice, thin slice of rib-eye.

My next test was to go thru all four sides on a much larger 12″ Sabatier INOX Chef’s knife. I have had that one for years, and have had thoughts about not even including it in the stuff for the move South because the edge never seems to stay up to par… I have to whet it nearly every time I take it out, so, I don’t take it out. Now, I think I’ll leave it in the to go pile. The edge came back to waaayyy sharp very quickly.

My final test will be to take this new block Upptacamp and see what it can do the pitiful losers in the knife drawer there… it’s a knife homeless shelter. Talk about orphans… those wretches could stage “Oliver”. [Anyway, I’ll try to remember to post an update after the next trip up.]

 

The four-sided hone block fits down nice and deep in the included rest, but the thumb cutouts mean it slips out easily to swap surfaces.

There are even a pair of rubber grippy strips underneath to prevent it from moving around. The endcaps also have EZ-reference markings indicating the grit strengths that you can see over the base edge.

Best of all for me was that the block in it’s base was the perfect height to just fit down in my knife drawer without catching!

So far, and all and all, this seems a good deal at the price if you want something handy to keep you cutting in the kitchen.

 

Interestingly enough, the Harbor Freight price is several dollars cheaper than the same block [under different names] over on Amazon. So, obviously this is a Chinese made jobbie that gets rebranded over here. However, it seems to make the 90%/50% grade, given that a set of three graded diamond mini-paddle hones from DMT will run you $23+, I think it was money well spent.

The Project Knife~ bonus

I almost took a “flyer”on this second “project” knife a week or so ago. Fortunately, it went for a price above my pay-grade, finally selling for $44US plus $7.99 s/h… fair, but not for me right now.

Described on eBay offering as:

“NICE OLD WADE & BUTCHER “TEDDY” MODEL, TEDDY ETCHED INTO BLADE, KNIFE SHOWS AGE AND SHARPENING, STACKED LEATHER HANDLE SLIGHTLY DRY, POMMEL CAP SHOWS SLIGHT DINGS, BLADE SHOWS SOME IDIOT PUTTING GRINDER MARKS ON IT.  SHEATH IS CRUDELY HANDMADE WITH A CROSSDRAW BELT LOOP BUT SHEATH IS IN GOOD CONDITION !”

Wade & Butcher are well known British cutlery makers in Sheffield, and most Sheffield is pretty nice steel… carbon and well formulated. Most interesting about this though is that the “TEDDY” is supposedly the first widely offered “stainless” steel hunting knife made.

The grip seems a bit bulbous to my taste, but I really loved the brass spaced catalin decorative disks at each end, and the single tang blade guard.

The fool and his grinder marks I can deal with, but what put me off making any bid was that I could see that the blade was rather heavily worn in right there before the ricasso [the squared off chunk between the edge and the guard… zoom the photo and you can really see it]. That was going to mean substantial regrinding forward on toward the point to flatten the bottom edge.

Still and all…. that’s a really nice looking knife, I will probably keep my eye on eBay in case another one comes along.

EDIT~ for a second “Bonus

Just to show that you can pick up a “good enough” used knife in reasonable condition for a reasonable price…. I passed on this KA-BAR USA 11″ Stacked Leather Bowie Knife with Leather Sheath as well, but it went for only $35US [shipped] over on eBay the other night… Screen Shot 2018-03-20 at 9.43.26 AM

 

 

 

 

 

“CAMPTON AX”

I finally received the small axe that I had ordered off AliBaba in the 11/11 sale. As I had already concluded, it was not a Chinese POC [piece-of-crap] It was a Russian POC. After playing with both a Cyrillic keyboard and a Russian to English translator site, I managed to figure out that they had branded the blade “Campton Ax”… do you suppose they were trying for “camping”?

FullSizeRender (15)

I am not even going to go into detail about it until I have messed with the axe some, but after having “bashed” it a bit in my previous post, I wanted to go into some digressive info on just why I had gone ahead and bought one. For now you can check it out in the post from a week ago was about “Chinese Inscrutable Advertising“.

The site description on this axe was a wonderful example of the difficulty in translating/ transliterating between languages, and the misuse and overuse of catchwords. It was described it as “Damask” steel at one point, 440 Stainless at another, and high-carbon steel in a third. I guess the first instance is a misunderstanding of the word Damascus, which is used to describe both a type of  highly-figured and layered steel, and a historic manufacturing process. The other two phrases are frequently used in the descriptions on forums discussing high-quality knives… I guess they just seem catchy. Not accurate, but catchy.

In fact, the little axe I got is 65X13 steel. This is the Russian made equivalent of AUS8… not a bad steel for this use at all. On other sites offering the same axe I had been able to see the branding on the shank, so I was pretty sure what it was actually made of. This elevated it just out of the POC range and made me think it was good for a shot as a “project piece” to see if I could bring it all the way up to worthwhile.

My second reason, and the real basis of this post, is that I have always wanted an “Ulu”.

    

These are two examples. The ulu is the traditional knife of the Inuit peoples of the North American Arctic. Before the white man and his supplies of metal, they had knapped a similar shape in stone, and beaten them out of copper ores. It was their butchery tool for whale blubber and sealife.

    

The ulu is generally made of moderately thick sheet metal with a handle above the blade as you seen in the above photos. They cut smoothly, and are surprisingly maneuverable. I know a guy who regularly dresses out his deer with one.

Newer designs are moving toward a more modern esthetic, upgraded materials, and a truly ergonomic styling. They also are making the blades heavier and profiled more like a traditional hunting knife. Benchmade is producing a version they have named “Nestucca” that retails for $150US.

The beautiful units from Bliss [shown in first photo above] are made to order, and start from $130 depending on handle material. Those kind of prices put them way out of my reach, but the little Russian jobbie is as close to an ulu as the “Nestucca”, and was only about $11 on sale/shipped. That fits with my whole 90% utility for 50% of the price deal.

I’m hoping to end up with a fireside beater for wood prep and an alternative blade for use in the camp kitchen. I’ll let ya’ll know how the progress goes, and what the verdict might be some time soon.

Titaniumophilia~~ A Wake-Up Call For Gram-Weenies

(1) Titanium is… The Fairy Queen in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream? Nope. That was Titania. Dang.

(2) Titanium is… Proof that you’ve spent more money on your cook set (or stove, or boot lace tips) than anyone else in your hiking group (extended family, city, state, province, country, continent).

(3) Titanium is… Proof that you’re trendy, and possibly an idiot, though still a trendy one. Let’s hope you can dress the part.

(4) Titanium is… A metal incorrectly described by absolutely everyone stupid as “amazingly lightweight and strong, and perhaps the way to go if you’re obsessive about ounces.”

(5) No, it isn’t. But what would you expect to read in Backpacker magazine?

 

Titanium is a metal. And titanium is light, compared to uranium, but not compared to steel.

Stoveless and cook-pot-less and fuel-less is the way to go if you’re obsessive about ounces, and can gag down cold suppers night after night.

Aluminum, however, is the way to go if you’re obsessive about ounces and grams and price, and if you like to compare the weight of your tools to the weight of their shadows.

Titanium is only 12% lighter than steel, though it has almost all of steel’s strength, while aluminum is 54% lighter than steel and still has 75% of steel’s strength (Spot the trend here?), which is enough for a cook pot.

Titanium doesn’t ding or dent very easily (because it’s tough, which is nice), and titanium is highly resistant to corrosion (which means that it stays pretty). Since it is tough, it can be rolled thin. The thinner the material, the less there is of it, and so the less the finished product weighs, even if it’s made from heavy materials, which is the real advantage of titanium.

But if you want a cooking pot and you don’t care a lot about exactly how pretty it is, but you do care about how heavy it is, then aluminum is the way to go. You sort of care about how tough a pot is and you probably care a whole lot about how much it costs. You may also kind of care how beat up it’s going to end up being, eventually, or not. Your call, eh?

Titanium as a material is significantly heavier and vastly more expensive than aluminum, but tougher, and those who own titanium items feel smarter because titanium looks new longer. A lot of people who feel that way don’t go backpacking because if they go backpacking they will get their clothes dirty and they will get tired, and what they really above all want is to keep that just-off-the-shelf, crisply-pressed, newly-unwrapped look, while continuing to smell of aftershave. Titanium will help with that.

Titanium is for them. Titanium is for people who don’t ever want to sweat or walk uphill or know that bugs might actually be attracted to them.

 

Thanks [and apologies for the mild reformatz] to // so says eff

For me, the bottom line is that aluminum is simply better for cooking… better and more even heating/conductivity, less scorching and burning, perfectly acceptable weight tradeoff… and way less moolah. It’s a 90%/50% thing.

—-

“Elevate Your Perspective”~ a Full Sub-$100 Hammock Setup

To look for the Perseids meteor shower, I decided to try out my “cheap” stuff for a hang last night out in my yard nook.
I wanted to make the point to any n00bs to the hammock hanging adventure who might find this post that a full setup doesn’t have to break the bank. I also wanted to be sure that what I might be loaning out to “elevate someone’s perspective” wasn’t a complete POS.

This whole setup comes in at under $100US.

  • generic ENO/GT clone- branded “White Mountain” $20
  • Rolling Fox diamond tarp- 11’x 9′ on the diagonals- $32 [w/ suspension/tieout paracord and steel stakes][Strangely enough, the stakes were not pointed at all.. just flat cut… and HEAVY]
  • TQ and UQ Diy-ed from two CDTs- $40 the pair
  • straps from Harbor Freight- $4
  • [toss in the illuminated yard stake/trek pole- $5 at the Fell-Off-A-Truck Stop and we go to $101]

I’m not going to count the upgrade mods to suspension, stakes etc. since that was from stuff that I was already out of pocket for any way, and wouldn’t be any big whup to the basic experience if it hadn’t been already done.

 

As far as the hammock goes, just about all of these ENO/GT [EaglesNestOutfitters/GrandTrunk] clones will be basically identical. They nearly all come from the same factories in China, and are of the same, non-ripstop parachute fabric. I would suggest that you not get the “double” hammocks unless you are a really big person. My experience is that the extra width [beyond 58″] just means you have a lot of loose cloth flapping in your face.  I personally don’t see any point in paying the brand-name prices for this kind of hammock. Amazon shows prices today ranging from $ 54 95$ 130 33 on ENO Single Nests. That difference buys you most of the rest of the kit described in this post.

Sleeping last night in this White Mountain hammock: I will have to admit that I was hyper aware of the seams from the clone’s 3-piece construction [40″ center strip w/9″ side piecings]. They were more annoying than anything, and were worst up along my shoulder, but certainly weren’t a deal breaker. Once I was down for the count, I slept fine. They made me assume that the clone was narrower than the 58″ full-width fabrics that are standard on the netless hammocks from our “cottage” vendors, but when I measured it this morning for this post it came in at the full 58″. This particular hammock goes 9’8″ fabric end-to-end. This is also shorter than the offerings from the cottage vendors, most of which are available from 10′-12′.

These differences in size and construction, together with the less stretchy, ripstop fabric options the cottage vendors offer, are the prime reason so many folks move on from the hammocks available in the big-box stores.
As a $20 hammock, and for a day-hanger/napper and starting place for hammocking, it is just fine. If it had come in at ENO$$, I’d certainly recommend spending that same $$ on a netless from the Hammock Forum vendors. [My first hammock was a Grand Trunk Double. I spent a few nights in it, got a little education over on hammockforums.net, and sent it back for a refund. That $70 went toward the cost of my AMOK Draumr and I never looked back.]

The 12′ poly straps from Harbor Freight are meant to be cam-cinched with a come-along ratchet for use on pickups and SUV racks. A quick hacksaw job to remove the ratchets and you have decent enough pair of straps. They are not daisy-chain looped, so you do have to learn to tie a larks-head hitch and use a toggle, but they can just be passed through their own end loops at the tree end. Cheap and easy!

 

The Rolling Fox diamond shaped tarp is new to me in the last few days. I wanted something mostly as a dew cover for fair weather hanging, and to use as a sunshade. The diamond cut appealed to me since it would mean I could rig it narrow-wise as well for a deeper shade when in a camp chair during the day. I do have some concern because the ridgeline [in the 11′ orientation] is seamed, and does not appear to have been seam-sealed. I like the tarp well enough that I will take that chance and seal it if I have to. [Besides, this vendor does offer a “lifetime, 100% money-back guarantee!”. I was in touch with him about the ridge, and he gave me his assurance on it.]

This one is what I had on hand and fit the cost limits. There are many other tarps on Amazon and elsewhere that come in at the same relative price point. If you want a square one, or cat-cut sides, go that way. This whole post is just to point out what you CAN get in the hundred dollar range. They are all going to be in a heavier [maybe 50%-70%] fabric, but they will be PU-waterproofed, and will certainly keep you dry. Up your purchase by a few bucks and you can step up to a 10’x 13′ hex-cut from YuEdge. [I thought about that one myself, just to have an extra rain tarp for bad days]. Go another few dollars and you can get a fully catenary cut 12′ x 12′ tarp from Mountainsmith. Most of them will not be made from a ripstop fabric, though some are and some aren’t.

With these low cost, entry-level tarps the one thing to shy away from is selecting one just because they “include” stakes, tie-out lines, and carabiners. These “bonuses” are all going to be cheaper, heavier, and far, far crummier than you are going to want in the long run. [For example, nothing that was included with the Fox tarp really made the grade]. Plus, these items are so easy to upgrade or source yourself that they are simply a waste of your money.  The same thing applies to the hammock suspensions. They are the first thing you are probably going to want to change out. Once you have tried getting the knots out of a swollen rope suspension, you will know what we are talking about. Doing these items on your own isn’t going to add much to your budget, but will give a lot more satisfaction.

 

I am not going into detail* about turning the Costco Down Throws into top and under-quilts. All I will tell you is that the CDTs are much better value than any others I have seen. Nicer material, higher volume/ better quality down, excellent construction, incredible loft for the cost… and possibly most import to a conversion, a full 60″x 70″ size. I don’t care if the brand is Eddie Bauer, BedBath&Beyond or any other reputable one… Accept No Substitutes! You will not get as good a finished project for your $$, time, and efforts. [and the good news is that they are already back in stock at many Costcos for the 2017-18 season]

If you want to save money, you can skip investing in a TQ altogether for a long while. Any sleeping bag will get you through. However, wriggling into and out of a regular or mummy bag once you are in your hammock is a real PITA. Instead, just open the zip to the foot and use it as an open quilt on top. You can even cut off the zipper and do a drawstring footbox with some ribbon loops easily enough.

If you can’t afford to go for a UQ, you can get a really reasonable rest on a closed-cell foam pad. Wally’s has one for $14. That said, after your hammock and tarp, I think most experienced hammockers would tell you to go for a UQ. The pads, even high cost insulated ones like ThermaRest, are notoriously hard to stay on top of in a hammock. None of the cheapo hammocks have double layer fabric pockets that help hold a pad in place, so , if you can, go for a UQ.

* Instuctables on CDT conversions are all over the web.

So, yada-yada complete… what was my “cheap night out” like. I’d have to say it was better than OK. Certainly better than I remember from my ground-dweller days. No rocks, lumps and sticks poking me in the back. No crawling around on damp ground. No crinkly ground sheet. I won’t have any problem loaning this whole setup out for somebody wanting to “elevate their perspective”. If I didn’t have my experience so far, I would probably give it a real thumbs up. Will I keep using my higher quality gear? …Duh!

Now, the hanging was “OK”, but the Perseids had peaked Friday and Saturday nights, so I only saw a couple of tracers. However, it was wickud clear, and the Milky Way was spectacular.
Basically, I was in a hammock…Out under the stars… what’s not to like?

It Ain’t the Ghost Whisperer!

However, at $17.28 including shipping from ShamSuiPo, I, for one, am not going to be arguing. The GW goes for $319.

When I was at a hang this Spring with my friend Iuri, I admired the jacket he had on assuming it to be a Ghost Whisperer… he’s a hip, young, upwardly mobile kind of guy who has the money for that type of thing. He said, “no, China”. So, when we were getting blown around by the lake winds up at the kayak hang recently, and I really wished I had some kind of a lightweight, but warm coat, I thought enviously of Iuri’s. When I got back, I looked ’em up on ALiBaba and ordered one. I don’t think I could’ve been happier even if I had the opportunity to actually try it on. For my needs, and at my kind of the price, it’s perfect… light, comfortable, warm, sufficiently wind-proof. I love the color, too. [much more a darker, blue-black than the photo shows] It’s the perfect thing to toss on just after dawn and before the day warms up, or once the evening shadows creep in and the temps drop.

Now… in fairness to the GW it reputedly has more down, and of a kind that is specially treated for loft and water repellency. But it also is only “stitch-thru” construction. $319 is a whole lot of money for a coat that isn’t even baffle-channeled. True, it is designed for layering, with an “active fit” for “climbing in the alpine, long-haul backpacking trips, and peak-bagging bids, where packing light and moving fast is key to reaching your objective”…. I have tried one on and found the fit restrictive on my less-than-fit, sixty-seven year-old body.

Specs~~ GW vs. “Joobox” branded:

  • 7D x 10D ripstop nylon / Polyester
  • claimed garment weight 7 oz / weighed @9.7 oz w/sack
  • down~ Q.Shield 800 fill-down / 90% white duck [no fill rating… seems like 650/700]
  • fill weight~2.6 oz / 2.5 oz
  • no hood on compared models
  • GW is designed to self-stuff into a pocket / Joobox came with a stuff sack
  • Joobox has two zippered slash hand pockets at the side-seams and two large interior, flat, “bag” pockets / GW~unspecified, but does have an adjustable, drawstring hem that the Joobox lacks

These don’t seem like a lot of differences to account for the $300 price differential. However, I don’t own a Ghost Whisperer jacket so I can’t pretend to do any real, considered, comparison here. There might very well be other differences that I am not aware of. That said, the Joobox jacket is my 90%/50% kind of deal [actually for only 5% in this case].

While it is simply specified to be a generic polyester material, I really like the “hand” to the fabric used on the Joobox. Nice and soft to the touch, easy to slide on the sleeves, soft around the neck and under the chin. Maybe it will prove to wear quickly or something. Due to the very large variations between Chinese and Western size charts, I ordered an XXL… while I have never bought anything in XXL before in my life, this was a perfect fit. [It is what I would expect in a men’s “Large” from someplace like Cabelas or L.L. Bean]. It is also roomy enough not to bind, and to allow for layering.

The Joobox’s one odd feature is that it came with the front zipper reversed… I expect to hold the pull in my right hand, and feed the little tang into it with my left. I am not certain, but I believe that women’s fashions may have the zipper reversed like this. This one was listed under “Men’s Wear”, was most definitely shown on a bearded male model, and is definitely not cut for a woman’s figure… Again, at this price I am not complaining. Oh, and in the stuff sack, it goes down to the size of a 12oz soda. I’ll give the bag a silicon/hydrophobic treatment with Atsko spray and be good to go. I also plan on spraying the entire jacket [exterior] with the Permethrin semi-permanent insect repellent to help keep the lil’ buggers at bay.

>> Good Deal / Highly Recommended <<